Thursday, March 31, 2016

The Great Pied Hornbill

The Great Pied Hornbill, Great Hornbill, Pied Hornbill, Great Indian Pied Hornbill
The Great Pied Hornbill 

Location: Vazhachal forest, Thrissur Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 23/03/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6e ed vr af-s
© www.indianwildlifephotographer.com © www.facebook.com/indianwildlifephoto


The great hornbill or Buceros bicornis also known as the great Indian hornbill or great pied hornbill, is one of the larger members of the hornbill family. It is found in South and Southeast Asia. Its impressive size and colour have made it important in many tribal cultures and rituals. The great hornbill is long-lived, living for nearly 50 years in captivity. It is predominantly frugivorous, but is an opportunist and will prey on small mammals, reptiles and birds.

The great hornbill is a large bird, 95–130 cm (37–51 in) long, with a 152 cm (60 in) wingspan and a weight of 2.15–4 kg (4.7–8.8 lb). It is the heaviest, but not the longest, Asian hornbill. Females are smaller than males and have bluish-white instead of red eyes, although the orbital skin is pinkish. Like other hornbills, they have prominent "eyelashes".

The most prominent feature of the hornbill is the bright yellow and black casque on top of its massive bill. The casque appears U-shaped when viewed from the front, and the top is concave, with two ridges along the sides that form points in the front, whence the Latin species epithet bicornis (two-horned). The back of the casque is reddish in females, while the underside of the front and back of the casque is black in males.


The casque is hollow and serves no known purpose, although it is believed to be the result of sexual selection. Male hornbills have been known to indulge in aerial casque butting, with birds striking each other in flight. The male spreads the preen gland secretion, which is yellow, onto the primary feathers and bill to give them the bright yellow colour. The commissure of the beak is black and has a serrated edge which becomes worn with age.

The wing beats are heavy and the sound produced by birds in flight can be heard from a distance. This sound has been likened to the puffing of a steam locomotive starting up. The flight involves stiff flaps followed by glides with the fingers splayed and upcurled. They sometimes fly at great height over forests.

Hornbill feeding, great hornbill, Buceros bicornis, great Indian hornbill, great pied hornbill
Great Hornbill Feeding Moments

Location: Vazhachal forest, Thrissur Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 23/03/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 200-500mm f/5.6e ed vr af-s
© www.indianwildlifephotographer.com © www.facebook.com/indianwildlifephoto

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Indian Elephant or Elephas Maximus Indicus

 Indian elephant,Elephas maximus indicus,  Asian elephant, 	Elephantidae
Indian Elephant or Elephas Maximus Indicus

Location: Vazhachal forest, Thrissur Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 19/02/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

The Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus) is one of three recognized subspecies of the Asian elephant and native to mainland Asia. Since 1986, Elephas maximus has been listed asEndangered by IUCN as the population has declined by at least 50% over the last 1 to -1 years or three generations. Asian elephants are threatened by habitat loss, degradation and fragmentation

Velvet-fronted Nuthatch

velvet-fronted nuthatch, Sitta frontalis, bird, small passerine bird, Sittidae, nuthatch family Sittidae, Passeriformes,
Velvet-fronted Nuthatch
Location: vazhachal forest, Thrissur Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 19/02/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G
© www.indianwildlifephotographer.com © www.facebook.com/indianwildlifephoto
The velvet-fronted nuthatch or Sitta frontalis is a small passerine bird found in southern Asia from Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka east to south China and Indonesia. It is a member of thenuthatch family Sittidae.

Habitat and Behavior
It is a resident breeder of all types of woods, although open evergreen forest is the optimal habitat.
It has the ability, like other nuthatches, to climb down trees, unlike species such as woodpeckers which can only go upwards. It is an active feeder on insects and spiders, and may be found in mixed feeding flocks with other passerines.
This is a noisy bird, often located by its repeated “sit-sit-sit” call.

Description
The velvet-fronted nuthatch has the typical nuthatch big head, short tail and powerful bill and feet. It is 12.5 cm long. It is violet-blue above, with lavender cheeks, beige underparts and a whitish throat. The bill is red, and there is a black patch on the forehead. The male also has a black supercilium.

Females lack the supercilium and have a warmer underpart colour. Juveniles are duller versions of the adult. There are four races differing in the shade of the underparts and the extent of white on the throat.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Indian Cobra or Naja Naja

Indian Cobra, Naja Naja, Spectacled cobra, Asian cobra, Binocellate cobra, www.indianwildlifephotographer.com, indian wildlife photographer, indian wildlife, wildlife photographer
Indian Cobra or Naja Naja

Location: Chirakkadavu, Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 05/02/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G
© www.indianwildlifephotographer.com © www.facebook.com/indianwildlifephoto

The Indian cobra (Naja naja) also known as the Spectacled cobra, Asian cobra or Binocellate cobra is a species of the genus Naja found in the Indian subcontinent (India, Pakistan) and a member of the "big four" species that inflict the most snakebites on humans in India.[4] This snake is revered in Indian mythology and culture, and is often seen with snake charmers. It is now protected in India under the Indian Wildlife Protection Act (1972).

Wax Dart or Cupitha purreea

Wax Dart, Cupitha purreea, Cupitha, Hesperiidae, www.indianwildlifephotographer.com, indian wildlife photographer, wildlife photographer, indian wildlife, Butterfly of Kerala
Wax Dart or Cupitha purreea


Location: Chirakkadavu, Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 05/02/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

Cupitha purreea, commonly known as the Wax Dart, is a butterfly belonging to the family Hesperiidae and only species of the Cupitha genus. Upperside blackish-brown ; cilia yellow, slightly alternated with black ; forewing with a gamboge-yellow basal streak, and a median oblique irregular band commencing from near apex, extending to hindmargin and terminating at its base ; hindwing with a short median yellow band. Underside sulphur-yellow; forewing with a broad darkbrown basal streak, a small spot at end of cell, and a large patch at posterior angle ; hindwing with a brown-speckled streak along inner margin, terminating broadly at anal angle. Body above brown, head and thorax interspersed with yellow hairs ; abdomen narrowly banded with yellow; palpi black above, yellow below. Legs and body beneath yellow. Female Larger than the male, with the yellow discal basal throughout in the posterior wings, but only in the interno-median area in the anterior ones, and the yellow portions of the cilia, especially towards the inner and anal angles, darker, inclining to orange. Mr. de Niceville notes that the male has a bare patch at the end of the cell on the upperside of the hindwing on which is placed an oval patch of closely packed scales. 



Plains Cupid or Chilades Pandava

Plains Cupid, Chilades pandava , Butterfly, www.indianwildlifephotographer.com, indian wildlife photographer, indian wildlife, wildlife photographer
Plains Cupid or Chilades Pandava

Location: Chirakkadavu, Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India.
| Date: 06/02/2016 Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G
 © www.indianwildlifephotographer.com © www.facebook.com/indianwildlifephoto


This is Plains Cupid (Chilades pandava), also known as the Cycad Blue, founded in Ponkunnam, Korratam Dist, Kerala. Is a species of Lycaenid butterfly found in India, Ceylon, Burma, Indochina, Peninsular Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, Java, Sumatra and the Philippines. They are among the few butterflies that breed on plants of the cycad family. 



Monday, February 1, 2016

Dark Cerulean or Jamides Bochus

Dark Cerulean, Jamides Bochus, Butterfly, Indian Wildlife Photographer, small butterfly

Dark Cerulean or Jamides Bochus

Location: Chirakkadavu, Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 01/02/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G
© www.indianwildlifephotographer.com © www.facebook.com/indianwildlifephoto

The Dark Cerulean (Jamides bochus) is a small butterfly found in India that belongs to the Lycaenids or Blues family. Male upperside, fore wing: velvety jet-black; base deep blue, beautifully metallic and shining, measured on the dorsum this colour occupies three-fourths of its length from base, its outer margin then curves upwards just past the apex of the cell, entera into the bases of interspaces 10, 11 and 12 and fills the whole of the cell. Hind wing: costal margin above subcostal vein and vein 7, and dorsal margin narrowly fuscous black, a medial longitudinal pale streak on the former; terminal margin narrowly edged with velvety black, inside which in interspaces 1 and 2 is a slender transverse whitish line, with an elongate irregular transverse black spot above it in interspace 1 and a more obscure similar spot in interspace 2; traces of such spots also are present in some specimens in the anterior interspaces. Cilia of both fore and hind wings black; filamentous tail at apex of vein 2 black tipped with white. Underside : dark chocolate-brown. Fore and hind wings; transversely crossed by the following very slender white Hues all more or less broken into short pieces:—Fore wing: a short pair one on each side of and parallel to the discocellulars, a pale streak along the discocellulars themselves; a single line in continuation of the outer of the discocellular lines, extends down to vein 1; an upper discal pair of lines that form a more or less catenulated short band extend from the costa to vein 3, the inner line of the two continued to vein 1; two more obscure subterminal and a single terminal line, the area enclosed between the subterminal lines and between them and the terminal line darker in the interspaces, giving the appearance of two obscure subterminal lines of spots edged inwardly and outwardly by white lines. Hind wing: crossed by nine very broken and irregular lines; tracing them from the costa downwards their middle short pieces are found to be shifted outwards and a few are short and not complete, the inner two are posteriorly bent abruptly upwards, the subtcrminal two are lunular and the terminal line nearly continuous; posteriorly between the subterminal pair of lines in interspace 1 there is a small black spot inwardly edged with dark ochraceous, and in interspace 2 a much larger round black spot, both black spots are touched with metallic blue scales. Antennae, head, thorax and abdomen black, the shafts of the antennae speckled with white; beneath: palpi, thorax and abdomen narrowly white down the middle.


Female. Similar to the male generally but with the following differences: upperside, fore wing: ground-colour fuscous opaque black, not velvety black, blue basal area more restricted and not so deep a blue nor at all metallic. Hind wing: the black costal and terminal margins very much broader, the blue on the basal area consequently much.restricted and of the same shade as the blue on the fore wing; terminal margin with a subterminal anteriorly obsolescent series of spots of a shade darker than that of the terminal black area on which they are superposed; these spots posteriorly more or less distinctly encircled with slender lines of bluish white, anteriorly these lines are almost obsolete. Cilia of both fore and hind wings and the filamentous short tail as in the male. Underside: similar to that oE the cf but the ground-colour generally paler and duller; the transverse white lines broader and more dearly defined. Antenna, head, thorax and abdomen as in the male. wiki/Jamides_bochus