Saturday, January 23, 2016

Grass Jewel or Chilades Trochylus

Grass Jewel, Chilades Trochylus, Butterfly, indian wildlife photographer, praveen g nair, wildlife photographer

Grass Jewel or Chilades Trochylus

Location: Chirakkadavu, Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 24/01/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

This is Uncommon butterfly in Kerala, The Grass Jewel is a small butterfly found in Chirakkadavu, Ponkunnam, Kerala, India, and also seen Africa southern Europe, India and southern Asia that belongs to the Lycaenids or Blues family.Male upperside: brown, somewhat variable in tint. Specimens from dry localities are much, paler than those taken in areas with a comparatively heavy rainfall. Forewing : uniform, with a very ill-defined anticiliary dark line in some specimens. Hind wing: a subterminal series of round black spots crowned with pale ochraceous, the posterior four spots generally well defined and outwardly edged with white, the anterior spots obsolescent and without the interior edging of yellow or the outer edging of white; a well-marked, slender anticiliary black line. Cilia white, basal halves brown. Underside: pale silky brown. Forewing: with the following white markings:—a short line on the inner and outer sides of the discocellulars ; a transverse, slightly curved, discal series of small, more or less incomplete rings; a transverse postdiscal series of disconnected slender lunules; a subterminal series of similar but more regular lunules and a terminal broken line, followed by a dark unbroken anticiliary line; the groundcolour between the two short discocellar lines, that enclosed within each ring of the discal markings, and between the sub-terminal lunules and the terminal line slightly darker than on the rest of the wing. Hind m ing: two short white lines on the discocellulars ; the discal, poatdiscal and terminal markings as on the fore wing, except that enclosed between the subterminal series of white lunules and the terminal white line is a complete series of dark spots, the posterior three or four jet-black sprinkled outwardly with metallic-green scales and encircled with pale ochraceous. In addition there are a transverse subbasal series of four white-encircled black spots and a similar subcostal spot in middle of interspace7. Antennae, head, thorax and abdomen brown, the shaft of the antennce speckled with white; beneath: palpi, thorax and abdomen white. Female upperside and undersides : ground-colour and markings as in the male, but the latter larger and more clearly defined; on the hind wing the yellow crowning the black spots on the tornal area on the upperside and surrounding the same on the underside, wider and more prominent. Antennae, head, thorax and abdomen as in the male. wiki/Chilades_trochylus

Monday, January 18, 2016

Common Castor or Ariadne Merione


Common Castor or Ariadne Merione

Sighted In: Chirakkadavu, Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 19/01/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

The Common Castor (Ariadne merione) is an orange butterfly with brown lines whose larvae feed almost exclusively on Castor Ricinus communis. It is similar in appearance to Ariadne ariadne, the Angled Castor. This species is found in south-eastern Asia. Their wingspan ranges between 30–35 mm. Like others in the Nymphalidae family, their front two legs are small and unused, effectively making them four-legged. These smaller appendages are covered with long hairs, giving them the characteristic brush look. Male: Upper side brownish ochraceous. Fore and hind wings crossed by slender, somewhat obscure, very sinuous or zigzag dark basal, two subbasal and two discal lines disposed in pairs, followed by a single, sometimes double, postdiscal and a single subterminal slender line. All these lines more or less interrupted anteriorly on the hind wing, which has a smooth unmarked uniform appearance from costa to subcostal vein and vein 5. On the fore wing there is in addition a series of obscure spots between the postdiscal and subterminal markings, arid a small white subcostal spot before the apex.

Underside much as in Ariadne ariadne, but the transverse chestnut bands broader, more diffuse. Antennae, head, thorax and abdomen brownish ochraceous. Sex-mark on the underside of the fore wing as in A. ariadne no sex-mark on upper side of hind wing;

Female: Similar; but on the upperside the transverse lines broader, more diffuse, with a greater tendency to form bands; the postdiscal line always double, forming a band traversed by a series of dark ochraceous spots in the interspaces; these lines and bands continuous, not interrupted anteriorly on the hind wing as they are in the male. Underside: except for the sex-mark, as in the male.

Saturday, January 16, 2016

Gaika Blue or Tiny Grass Blue (Zizula hylax)


Gaika Blue or Tiny Grass Blue (Zizula hylax) Mating

Founded In: Paruthumpara, Idukki Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 08/01/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

This is Comom Butterfly in Kerala, Name Gaika Blue or Tiny Grass Blue (Zizula hylax) is a species of blue butterfly. Male Upperside: dull violet-blue, which changes to a brighter tint of violet in certain lights. Fore wing: the costa very narrowly, the termen much more broadly dull brown; this edging to the termen in most specimens decreases in width from apex to tornus, and is outwardly followed by an anticiliary darker brown line. Cilia brownish anteriorly, posteriorly brownish at the base with the apical portions white. Hind wing: the ground-colour brighter than on the fore wing, the costal and terminal margins much more narrowly edged with brown, which edging is merged in the anticiliary dark brown line. Cilia: brown along their basal halves, white apically.


Gaika Blue or Tiny Grass Blue

Underside: grey. Fore wing: a dusky brown lunular line on the discocellulars; two subcostal spots above the cell, one on either side of the discocellular lunule; a very strongly curved discal series of five spots, of which the posterior three are somewhat lunular in shape and placed obliquely en echelon, the next above these hook-shaped, the anterior spot round; both the subcostal spots and the spots of the discal series are black, each narrowly encircled with white; beyond these are inner and outer subterminal dusky lines, which anteriorly are continuous, posteriorly somewhat broken and macular, followed by a very conspicuous jet-black anticiliary slender line. Cilia greyish white, traversed by a medial transverse blackish-brown line. Hind wing: with the following small white-encircled black spots: a subbasal transverse series of three, followed by a highly curved series of eight spots, that curve across the disc of the wing to the costa and along the latter towards the base; discocellulars with a dusky short lunular line as on the fore wing; terminal markings and cilia similar, but the outer and broader subterminal line more broken and macular than on the fore wing. Antennae black, the shafts ringed with white; head, thorax and abdomen dark brown, with a little violet pubescence on the head and thorax; beneath: palpi, thorax and abdomen greyish white.

Female Upperside: glossy brown, without any violet tint whatever; the anticiliary darker brown lines on both fore and hind wings well marked. Underside: very similar to that of the male, the ground-colour a shade darker, the markings slightly larger and more prominent. Antenna, head, thorax and abdomen as in the male, but the latter three without a trace of violet or blue on the upperside.

Sunday, January 10, 2016

Clipper Butterfly or Parthenos Sylvia


Clipper Butterfly or Parthenos Sylvia

Founded In: Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 10/01/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

The Clipper (Parthenos sylvia) is a species of nymphalid butterfly found in South and South-East Asia, mostly in forested areas. The Clipper is a fast flying butterfly and has a habit of flying with its wings flapping stiffly between the horizontal position and a few degrees below the horizontal. It may glide between spurts of flapping. Male and female. Upperside : ground-colour a bright purple, the subhyaline white spots near the apex of cell in the fore wing more opaque, the broad discal band of large white spots proportionately more basal further from the termen and very irregular, the spots, especially towards the hinder part of the wing, more widely separated, the spot in interspace 5 more acutely triangular and smaller, the two spots above shifted obliquely inwards towards the costa, making the outer margin of the discal band angulate at interspaces 5 and 6. Hind wing: the postdiscal and sub-terminal markings broader and more diffuse than in P. gambrisius, giving a dark shade to the whole of the apical half of the wing. Underside pale greenish grey. Fore wing: the spots and markings except the basal black streaks as on the upperside, the groundcolour fading to an ashy grey towards the terminal margin. Hind wing similar to the underside of hind wing of P. gambrisius, but the discal transverse sinuous black line very broken and incomplete, the postdiscal, subterminal and terminal black markings somewhat better denned. Antennae black; head, thorax and abdomen bronze green, barred with black above ; beneath whitish. Western Ghats, Bangladesh, Assam, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, and Southeast Asia (Malaya, Philippines, and New Guinea).

Saturday, January 9, 2016

Catochrysops Strabo or Forget-Me-Not


Catochrysops Strabo or Forget-Me-Not

Founded In: Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 08/01/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

This is seasonal Butterfly in our place, sitting in all time sunlight and fast movement. Name Catochrysops strabo, the forget-me-not, is a small butterfly found in Asia that belongs to the Lycaenids or Blues family. It is found in Ceylon, India, from Sikkim to Indochina and in Sundaland,Sulawesi and the Philippines. The wingspan is 25–30 mm. The larvae feed on Ougeinia dalbergioides, Schleichera trijuga and Desmodium species. commonly seen - Peninsular India south of the outer ranges of the Himalayas; Ceylon; Assam ; Burma; Tenasserim; the Andamans; Nicobars; extending through the Malayan Subregion down to Australia.


Friday, January 8, 2016

Lesser Grass Blue or Zizina Otis


Lesser Grass Blue or Zizina Otis -matting 

Founded In: Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 07/01/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

This is commonly founded in our place winter season, The Lesser Grass Blue (Zizina otis) is a species of blue butterfly found in south Asia. The Lesser Grass Blue is often misidentified as the Common Grass Blue, Zizina labradus. Zizina otis occurs in south Asia. It was reported from Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 2008.  Zizina otis labradus is found in the North Island, and the northern part of the South Island of New Zealand. While the Zizina otis oxleyi is found in the southern part of the South Island of New Zealand only


Lesser Grass Blue or Zizina Otis


Founded In: Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 17/08/2015
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Centaur Cakblue or dull Cakblue (Arhopala Centaurus)


Centaur Cakblue or dull Cakblue (Arhopala Centaurus)

Founded In: Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 29/12/2015
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

This is Centaur oakblue or dull oakblue (Arhopala centaurus) is a species of lycaenid or blue butterfly found in Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist. Kerala, commonly found Asia.

Lestes elatus - Emerald Spreadwing


Lestes elatus  - Emerald Spreadwing 


Founded In: Panchalimedu, Idukki Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 29/12/2015
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

This is vary rare endemic damselfly name Lestes elatus Hagen in Selys - Emerald Spreadwing
founded in Panchalimedu, Idukki District Kerala, India. founded in India, Thailand and Sri Lanka.






Monday, January 4, 2016

Peninsular rock agama or South Indian rock agama, Psammophilus dorsalis


Peninsular rock agama or South Indian rock agama, Psammophilus dorsalis

Founded In: Paruthumpara, Idukki Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 24/12/2015
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

Kingdom: Animalia, Phylum: Chordata, Subphylum: Vertebrata, Class: Reptilia, Order: Squamata
Suborder: Iguania, Family: Agamidae, Genus: Psammophilus, Species: P. dorsalis

The Peninsular rock agama or South Indian rock agama, Psammophilus dorsalis, is a common species of agama found on rocky hills in south India. An allied species, Psammophilus blanfordanus, is found in the Eastern Ghats, but north of the range of this species.
This species of lizard has a large head that is elongated and depressed, with the cheeks swollen in adult males. The snout is longer than the diameter of the orbit (eye cavity). The upper head scales are unequal and smooth or obtusely keeled, the scales being larger on the sinciput (brow) than on the occiput. The canthus rostralis and supraciliary (brow) has a clear and sharp edge, two small separated spines or groups of spines above the ear are present or absent; the diameter of the tympanum is half or a little more than half that of the orbit; it has 10 to 13 upper and as many lower labial scales. The body is slightly flattened; dorsal scales are small, uniform, smooth, or feebly keeled in the adult,and strongly keeled in the young, all pointing backwards and upwards; the dorsal crest is reduced to a ridge of enlarged scales; ventral scales are as large as the dorsals, and smooth (keeled in the young); from 115 to 150 scales occur around the middle of the body; the gular (under chin) scales are a little smaller than the ventral (underside) scales; four or five enlarged scales occur on the chin parallel with the anterior labials, separated from them by two rows of scales; a strong transverse fold covered with small scales is seen across the throat; the nuchal and dorsal crests are merely tooth-like protrusions. The legs are strong, covered with uniform, keeled scales; the hind limb when extended forward in a specimen reaches the ear or the rear end of the eye, and further forward in younger individuals. The tail is slightly flattened and covered with keeled scales, which are larger below than above. In the adult male, it is distinctly swollen at the base, the scales on that part of it are thickened, and those of the upper median row are enlarged.

A female
Young and females are olive-brown, spotted, speckled, or marbled with dark brown, and with a series of white, elongated spots along each side of the back. The male has pale brownish colour on the top of the head and back, while the lips are yellowish-brown, and this extends as a strip beyond the ear. A dark brown or black lateral stripe begins behind the eye and broadens to cover the lower sides. The underside is yellow with the throat mottled with grey.

These lizards basks on bare rocks where they are hidden by their cryptic colouration. They feed on insects. The male in the breeding season assumes bright colours. The upper parts become fine vermilion red or yellow, the lip stripe is sometimes pink. The under surfaces, limbs, and tail are black.

From snout to vent, its length is 135 mm, the tail is 200 mm. Females are smaller.


Peninsular rock agama or South Indian rock agama, Psammophilus dorsalis ( closeup shot )

They are found in southern India, south of about 16°N latitude. In the Western Ghats, Nilgiris, South Arcot, and Nallamalai Hills, they are found in the hilly regions at altitudes up to 6000 ft above sea level in the Nilgiris. It is very common in some parts of the Nilgiris and it was noted as being particularly common near Bangalore by M.A. Smith in The Fauna of British India.

Sunday, January 3, 2016

Chliaria Othona or Orchid Tit


Chliaria Othona or Orchid Tit

Founded In: Paruthumpara, Idukki Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 24/12/2015
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

The orchid tit, Chliaria othona is a species of lycaenid or blue butterfly found in Asia.

The orchid tit is found in India, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, North Vietnam, Peninsular Malaysia

The orchid tit is a small butterfly which has a wingspan of 24 to 27 mm. The butterfly has two tails, one is 4 mm long at v1 and the other 2 mm long at v2.

UP:Male: The butterfly is pale blue above with three-fifths of the apex black. The apex and the costa of the HW are more narrowly black.Female: The female butterfly is brown in colour above with whitish lower part of the disc. The tornal area of the HW is very pale blue with serrated black markings.

UN: Both sexes are white below with black-edged brown markings and bars at end cell. The FW has a discal band which is broken around v4 and which is broader above the break. There is a prominent black costal spot above the mid-cell. The HW also has a discal band broken in 4 and 6 with a prominent black spot towards the base of 7.The butterfly also has prominent orange-crowned tornal spots.

Pulau Tioman and possibly Taiwan. In Inda the butterfly is found in the Western Ghats, the Himalayas from Garhwal to Assam, Bengal and onto Myanmar. In Sikkim, the orchid tit is found up to an altitude of 5000 ft.

Status - Rare in South India. Not Rare in the North.

Habits - The orchid tit is to be found in dense, rainy jungles. It is rarely seen except around its foodplants - the flower buds of epiphyticorchids. It flies weakly and settles on flowers, leaves. It visits damp patches. wiki/Chliaria_othona

Immaculate/Large/Suffused Snow Flat or Tagiades gana


Immaculate/Large/Suffused Snow Flat or Tagiades gana

Founded In: Ponkunnam, Kottayam Dist, Kerala, India. | Date: 03/01/2016
Camera Nikon D800e / Lens Nikon 105 mm f 2.8G 

Tagiades gana, commonly known as the Immaculate/Large/Suffused Snow Flat, is a butterfly belonging to the family Hesperiidae. Watson (1891) gives a detailed description as follows. Male and female have a dark brown ground colour. The male has on the upperside of the forewing, three minute semi-transparent spots obliquely before the apex ; a transverse discal series of streaks, a small patch within the cell, one near the base of the wing, and exterior margin blackish ; hindwing with the lower third pure white which is straightly separated from the brown of the basal portion ; apical margin and three spots on the upper part of the disc, black, and two spots on the middle of the white anterior margin. Underside paler brown, semi-transparent spots on forewing as above : hindwing white suffused with brown along the anterior margin : upper discal and marginal spots as above black. Female paler. Upperside somewhat greyish-brown ; forewing with spots and blackish discal streaks, and hindwing with upper discal spots as in male : exterior margin of hindwing greyish-white. Underside as in male. Cilia of both sexes pure white on the lower portion of the hindwing, the rest brown.